Wine decanted in a glass

The Do’s and Don’t’s of drinking and serving wine

Many women love to unwind by having a glass of wine.

But before you grab that glass and sip, do you know the etiquette for serving and drinking wine?

Fun facts to know about wine:

  1. Wine is made in virtually every country in the world.
  2. Intense fear or hatred of wine is called “oenophobia.”
  3. All wine is stored at the same temperature, regardless of its color. But reds and whites are consumed at completely different temperatures.
  4. One glass of wine consists of juice from one cluster of grapes.
  5. Red wine can only be made from blue or purple-skinned grapes. White wine can also come from these darker grapes, but only if the juice is separated from the skins.
  6. Rosé, which finds itself somewhere in between red and white, is most often crafted by allowing the juice limited and controlled contact with dark grape skins.

So when handling wine these are some of the Dos and Don’ts:

DOS

  • Consider decanting your wine – The real benefit of the process is that it gently exposes the wine to air, softening its acids and tannin, effectively smoothing out all the sharp edges and wrinkles. It can be particularly helpful in taming the funk that comes off so-called reductive wines.
  • Smell your glass before pouring in your wine – You wouldn’t want the wine fragrance coming in your way over a soapy glass or dust-covered glass. One of the best, most enjoyable parts about drinking wine is appreciating its fragrance.
  • Invest in a good opener – You wouldn’t want chunks of the cork going into your wine bottle.

DON’T’S

  • Serve your red wine too warm – Heat will exacerbate the alcohol content of a wine, making your nose hairs burn when you go in for a big whiff. Conventional wisdom generally dictates that light-to medium-bodied reds should be served around 13–15C, while fuller-bodied reds are better enjoyed in the 15–20C range.
  • Serve your white wines too cold – Why? Because you’ll taste less. Light-bodied, less-aromatic wines should be served colder, in the 4–8C range, whereas more expressive and fuller-bodied whites should ideally be served in the slightly-warmer-but-still technically cold range of 8–10C.
  • Overpour your glass: Seriously, no matter how rough the day. If the glass is too full and you try to do your best professional swirl-and-sniff, chances are you’re going to end up making a mess.
  • Let past-its-prime, open wine go to waste: See if you can’t find a recipe for a stew, or soup or sauce where it can be given a respectable second-chance at life.

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