More than 1 million people a day get STDs – WHO

More than a million people every day worldwide catch a sexually transmitted infection, with rates of chlamydia, gonorrhea, trichomoniasis and syphilis the most worrying, the World Health Organization said on Thursday.

The vast majority of the infections are easily preventable and curable, but some diseases – in particular gonorrhea – are evolving into super-bug forms and that are increasingly difficult to treat with antibiotics, the WHO said in a report.

‘Sexually transmitted infections are everywhere. They are far more common than we think,’ Teodora Wi, a medical officer in the WHO’s department for reproductive health and research, told reporters as the data were released.

Sexually transmitted infections or STIs are a 'persistent and endemic health threat worldwide' and have a profound impact on both adult and child health, the WHO said

The report, based on 2016 global data which are the latest available, showed that among men and women aged between 15 and 49 there were 127 million new cases of chlamydia in 2016, 87 million of gonorrhea, 6.3 million of syphilis and 156 million of trichomoniasis.

Sexually transmitted infections or STIs are a ‘persistent and endemic health threat worldwide’ and have a profound impact on both adult and child health, the WHO said.

If they are left untreated, they can lead to serious and chronic health effects that include neurological and cardiovascular disease, infertility, ectopic pregnancy, stillbirths and an increased risk of HIV.

Syphilis alone caused an estimated 200,000 stillbirths and newborn deaths in 2016, making it one of the leading causes of baby loss globally, the research said.

Peter Salama, the WHO’s executive director for universal health coverage, said the data showed the need for ‘a concerted effort to ensure everyone, everywhere can access the services they need to prevent and treat these debilitating diseases.’

-Dailymail

‘We are only in marriage to avoid STI’s and STD’s ‘ Brag Kenyan women

According to Kenyan men, single and available women do not know how to submit to a a man hence giving men who want to marry a headache.

During today’s morning conversation on Classic 105, Maina Kageni gave his callers a chance to contribute to the debate and here is what they had to say.

“Maina we were taught to love ourselves first and to take care of ourselves first. We  are in marriages to avoid STD’s and other disease take note.

This is because marriage ensures you have a consistent partner unlike when you are single”

Another caller says

“Women are too materialistic and they do not follow the bible’s teaching on submission that’s why they are not marriageable.”

Photos of Beril Ouma woman allegedly killed by her husband in Kahawa

Another female caller elicited a debate, after posing the question why do men want to act like boys yet expect women to submit

“Wako wapi wanaume wa kuoa, all we have now is boys who just want to sit down and watch movies all day.

Don’t expect me to go hustle and then come back and serve you, give you your conjugal rights yet you are not making an effort you are just sitting in the house.

Just man up and we will submit.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HP68sk2egTk

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Meet the species that gave us genital herpes

Scientists have identified the ancient hominin species that gave early humans genital herpes two million years ago.

Parathropus boisei was a heavyset human-like species that walked on two legs with a smallish brain and dish-like face.

It likely contracted the virus after eating infected ancestral chimpanzees, and then passed the pathogen onto us when hunted by Homo erectus for food.

THE ORIGINS OF GENITAL HERPES

Somewhere between three and 1.4 million years ago, genital herpes jumped the species barrier from African apes to human ancestors.

Scientists have previously speculated that the virus made the leap via an intermediate hominin species unrelated to humans.

Now, a team of scientists from Cambridge and Oxford Brookes universities have found that Parathropus boisei is to blame.

They suggest P. boisei most likely contracted the virus while eating ancestral chimp meat in an area where the African Savannah met surrounding forest.

The appearance of Homo erectus around 2 million years ago was accompanied by evidence of hunting and butchery.

Once again, consuming ‘infected material’ would have transmitted the virus – only this time it was P. boisei being devoured.

Close contact between P. boisei and our ancestor Homo erectus would have been fairly common around sources of water, such as Kenya’s Lake Turkana, the researchers found.

This provided the opportunity for the genital herpes virus to shift onto our bloodline.

‘Once this virus gains entry to a species it stays, easily transferred from mother to baby, as well as through blood, saliva and sex,’ said study coauthor Dr Charlotte Houldcroft, from the University of Cambridge.

‘The genital herpes virus would have crept across Africa the way it creeps down nerve endings in our sex organs – slowly but surely.’

Somewhere between three and 1.4 million years ago, genital herpes jumped the species barrier from African apes into human ancestors.

Scientists have previously speculated that the virus made the leap via an intermediate hominin species unrelated to humans.

Now, a team of scientists from Cambridge and Oxford Brookes universities have found that Parathropus boisei is to blame.

They suggest P. boisei most likely contracted the virus while eating ancestral chimp meat in an area where the African Savannah met surrounding forest.

The infection, which at the time came through the mouth rather than the genitals, probably seeped in via bites or open sores.

Hominins infected with cold sores may have initially been protected from this virus, known as HSV2.

But it quickly ‘adapted to a different mucosal niche’ to survive, the scientists said.

That mucosal niche was found in the genitals, causing the virus to move away from mouth-based infections toward the STI we know today.

The appearance of Homo erectus around 2 million years ago was accompanied by evidence of hunting and butchery.

Once again, consuming ‘infected material’ would have transmitted the virus – only this time it was P. boisei being devoured.

‘Herpes infect everything from humans to coral, with each species having its own specific set of viruses,’ said Dr Houldcroft.

THE STUDY

Study lead author and Cambridge researcher Dr Charlotte Houldcroft and her team used data ranging from fossil finds to herpes DNA and ancient African climates to come to their conclusion.

They input this data into a computer programme that modelled HSV2 transmission probabilities for the hominin species that roamed Africa three million years ago.

The researchers found the species with the highest transmission probability was Parathropus boisei – a genetic fit virally who was found in the right places to be the herpes intermediary.

‘By modelling the available data, from fossil records to viral genetics, we believe that Parathropus boisei was the species in the right place at the right time to both contract HSV2 from ancestral chimpanzees, and transmit it to our earliest ancestors, probably Homo erectus.’

‘For these viruses to jump species barriers they need a lucky genetic mutation combined with significant fluid exchange.

‘In the case of early hominins, this means through consumption or intercourse – or possibly both.’

Dr Houldcroft and her team used data ranging from fossil finds to herpes DNA and ancient African climates to come to their conclusion.

They input this data into a computer programme that modelled HSV2 transmission probabilities for the hominin species that roamed Africa three million years ago.

The researchers found the species with the highest transmission probability was Parathropus boisei – a genetic fit virally who was found in the right places to be the herpes intermediary.

‘By modelling the available data, from fossil records to viral genetics, we believe that Parathropus boisei was the species in the right place at the right time to both contract HSV2 from ancestral chimpanzees, and transmit it to our earliest ancestors, probably Homo erectus.’

Read more: dailymail

New Technology Helps People Self- Diagnose STD’s

Forget the shameful doctors visits one has when they are infected with STD/STI’s new app has been created created for tablets and smart phones, that will help you self-diagnose and self-treat STDs from home.

The app will be released next Tuesday, June 23rd but only California residents will be able to use the app as it is intended. They will be able to go into the app and order test kits for two different STDs; gonorrhea and Chlamydia.

The test kits are then sent to their home in discreet packaging complete with instructions. It is a urine sample kit which is then sent back to Planned Parenthood once the sample is collected Once analyzed  the results are sent to the patient through the app.

Should they test positive for Chlamydia they are given the option to have a prescription for antibiotics sent to their local pharmacy. They can take the medication and clear up the infection without ever having to see a doctor.

If they test positive for gonorrhea however they must go into either their regular doctor’s office or a Planned Parenthood clinic for an antibiotic injection. They are able to schedule an appointment right from the app.

This type of technology could lead to more people being able to get help for their STDs since the process is extremely discreet and they do not have to come face to face with another person or answer any embarrassing questions asked by their doctor.

Other technologies are being tested by Planned Parenthood in other states as well. In Washington and Minnesota patients can have a video conference with a nurse and they can get the STD testing kits. The consultations with the nurse practitioners can be either for birth control or other medications. This gives patients a wide variety of convenient options for being treated.

-BHW

7 Disturbing Facts You Never Knew About Yeast Infections

Between the itching, burning, and discharge, yeast infections can be a total pain in the…well, vagina. But did you know they’re not just a down-there problem? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are more than 20 different species of candida yeasts on and in your body (like, right now) that can cause a yeast infection—and not necessarily below the belt. Want to protect yourself? Here are seven more icky factoids you should know:

1. They’re Not the Most Common Vaginal Infection
That honor goes to bacterial vaginosis (BV), an infection that’s caused by an overgrowth of bacteria in the vagina. Much like a yeast infection, BV festers when the vagina’s pH levels are out-of-whack—but unfortunately, OTC treatments aren’t available. Because it’s caused by bacteria and not yeast, attempting to use yeast infection meds to combat BV can make your symptoms worse (cue the sad trombone). If you self-treat thinking it’s a yeast infection but your symptoms stick around, check in with your gyno to find out what’s what, says Antonio Pizarro, M.D., a board-certified gynecologist in Shreveport, Louisiana.

2. You Can Become Resistant to Over-the-Counter Treatments
Speaking of which, two out of three women who buy yeast infection meds don’t really have a yeast infection, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Over time, your body can become resistant to the treatment, making it that much harder to fight a legit yeast infection in the future. If you self-treat and don’t see results within a few days or your symptoms return within a month, it’s either a sign you’re resisting the meds—or that you’re treating the wrong condition, says Pizarro. It’s important to visit your gyno in either scenario so you can be treated properly.

3. You Can Get One in Your Mouth
It’s called thrush, and it’s just as nasty as it sounds. The yeast overgrowth causes cottage cheese-like lesions that can take over your mouth—tongue, cheeks, and gums—not to mention mess with your esophagus and make it über painful to swallow. Luckily, says Pizarro, thrush can be treated with a prescription of anti-fungal lozenges called troches. (Phew.)

4. They Can Be Caused By Your Poop
We wish we were kidding. Candida organisms set up shop in the rectum, so when you poop, it’s possible for the organisms to migrate to the vagina, says Jason James, M.D., a board-certified ob-gyn in Miami. There’s no foolproof way to prevent this, but “decreasing candida in the rectum might be accomplished by eating probiotics, and decreasing transmission might be achieved by good hygiene—showers preferably over baths,” says James. You should also avoid having vaginal sex immediately after anal sex to cut back on your chances of yeast moving from your rectum to your vagina, he adds.

5. Guys Can Get Them, Too
If a dude has unprotected sex with a woman and she has a yeast infection, he may end up with one, too. Symptoms can include itching, burning, redness, and a rash on the penis, says James. Most can be treated with an OTC yeast infection treatment (and it’s best you both be treated to avoid reinfecting each other). There may not be instructions for dudes on the box, so James recommends he apply the cream directly to the infected area twice daily for five to seven days.

6. They Can Be a Sign of Diabetes
This is not a drill: According to the Mayo Clinic, women whose blood sugar levels are out-of-whack are more likely to develop yeast infections. When your blood glucose level is high, the excess sugar increases the likelihood of yeast growth—and repeat infections. Pizarro recommends women with three or more yeast infections a year make an appointment to rule out diabetes or other serious conditions.

7. Pasta-Lovers Are More at Risk
Candida is naturally found in the digestive tract, but how much you have depends on your noshing habits. A 2013 study published in the journal PLOS One found people who ate oodles of carbs were more susceptible to yeast infections than people who munched on proteins, amino acids, and fatty acids. In fact, the participants’ candida levels increased immediately after eating carbs. (Don’t say we didn’t warn you.)

-womenshealthmag.com