Did You Know? Mothers With Postnatal DEPRESSION Are More Likely To Have DIFFICULT And Emotional Children. Details

Mothers with postnatal depression are more likely to have difficult children, new research reveals.

Sufferers of the mental health condition who are insensitive towards their children are more likely to have youngsters with difficult temperaments, a study found.

Researchers believe mothers who respond to their children’s needs, even if they are battling depression, teach their youngsters how to regulate negative emotions.

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Families with effective communication where everyone is involved in raising the children may also aid infant’s self-regulation, they found.

Lead author Dr Stephanie Parade from Brown University, said: ‘Maternal postpartum depression was only associated with persistently difficult infant temperament. This work underscores the importance of supporting families in the postpartum period.’

How the study was carried out  

Researchers from Brown University analyzed 147 families with children younger than 30 months.

The children’s temperaments were assessed at eight, 15 and 30 months old.

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Mothers were interviewed to determine whether they suffered from depression.

The families were observed to assess their function and the mother’s sensitivity.

Key findings 

Results revealed that depressed mothers who are insensitive towards their children are more likely to have youngsters with difficult temperaments.

Dr Parade said: ‘Maternal postpartum depression was only associated with persistently difficult infant temperament’.

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The researchers believe mothers who respond to their children’s needs, even if they are battling depression themselves, teach their youngsters how to regulate negative emotions.

Families with effective communication where everyone is involved in raising the children may also aid infant’s self-regulation, the researchers add.

Dr Parade added: ‘This work underscores the importance of supporting families in the postpartum period.’

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Daily Mail