Parents, here is the criteria being used for Form one intake

The form one selection process is something many parents worry about. Here are the new rules being used for the Form One intake process:

 

CRITERIA
The committee last week decided to use merit, school choice, equity and affirmative action as the key criteria. On the basis of the school a candidate selected, about 14,000 of the 248,000 plus students who scored between 350 and 400 marks were given places.
Another 4,000 students comprising the top five boys and the top five girls from each sub-county were selected to join the schools, ensuring students from marginalized areas were not left out. Some 1,606 students with special needs will also join national schools.

 

pupils at westlands school for kcpe

‘I was forced to breastfeed my husbands snakes’ Narrates woman

Below is the criteria being applied by the government

TOP GIRL
The top girl Olive Wachira from Riara School and the top Boy Rawlings Odhiambo from Kakamega Hill school, who scored 453 marks each, have been selected to join Kenya High and Alliance High School, respectively.

Bildad Olson, who led in the special needs category, will also join Alliance High School.

TRANSITION
The number of students joining national schools has increased to 31,337 from 29,712 in 2017 as the government pushes for complete transition to secondary school.

Ms Mohamed said the ministry will place 1,032,334 candidates in secondary schools following expansion of facilities. She said Sh16 billion is earmarked for infrastructure development in secondary schools in 2019.

REFUGEES
Apart from those joining national schools, another 128,838 students will join extra-county schools while the bulk of the students, 722,318, will join sub-county schools, which are mostly day schools. They will all report for Form One between January 7 and January 11, 2019.

Ms Mohamed said 12,045 places were reserved for refugees in Kakuma and Dadaab camps while 11,500 spaces in 356 centres will admit adult learners and private candidates above the age of 18.

ABSENTEES
“Inmates will continue with their education through the adult education programme in prisons while absentee candidates will be given an opportunity to register and take the examination next year,” she said.
Ms Mohamed said the ministry will also allow willing students to join the free day secondary school programme which was started last year.

Kenyans you did not know were related to President Uhuru Kenyatta

COUNTRYWIDE
The ministry started a day wing programme in 19 selected national schools in Nairobi and was to expand it to other schools countrywide later.
The schools that had been selected included Kenya High School, Starehe Boys Centre, Moi Forces Academy, Nairobi School, Lenana School, Pangani Girls High School and Moi Girls Secondary School, Nairobi.
Other schools are Ngara Girls, Buruburu Girls, Embakasi Girls, Arya Parklands, Nembu Girls, Dagorretti High, Langata Secondary, Upper Hill, St Georges Girls, State House Girls, Hospital Hill and Ofafa Jericho.

PUBLIC DAY
However, some students dropped out of the schools and opted to join boarding schools after reporting.
The government pays a capitation of Sh22,244 for all learners in public day schools under the Free Day Secondary Education. The amount is extended as a subsidy in boarding schools where the government has set the annual fees at Sh53,554. However, the fees rises to more than Sh100,000 in some national schools when levies agreed among parents, which the ministry discourages, are taken into account.

CRIME
“Charging illegal levies will be treated as a crime of corruption and attendant criminal measures taken against the culprits,” Ms Mohamed warned.
Once the Form One students report and are admitted to schools, their details will be captured online through the National Education Management Information System (Nemis).

Source: Daily Nation

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‘He said I had wasted 4 years worth of school fees’ Kenyans tell of how their parents reacted to their KCPE and KCSE results (Audio)

The Kenya Certificate of Primary Education results are out and Kenyans can’t keep calm, with many reminiscing how their parents reacted when they received the news back in the day.

During the Morning show on Classic 105 fans gave heartbreaking stories of how their parents termed them a disappointment just because they ‘failed’ something which haunts some of them up to date.

pupils at westlands school for kcpe

What caught our attention is the narration below by a man from Kisii

” I am a livestock keeper because I did not impress my dad. He was very bitter with my KCSE results in 2002. He told me that I had wasted four year’s worth of school fees and that I did not know what I had gone to do in school.

I did not go beyond form four so he bluntly told me that I should just keep livestock. The livestock sustains my life , looking back at my life now maybe I would have wasted a lot of time but I am a proud farmer.

I am actually the most respected farmer in our area.”

Kenyan comedians you did not know were parents, see photos of their kids

Another adds

“KCPE and KCSE marks do not determine your future. I did better than my twin sister and my mum used to blame her but she is doing well in life, 10 times more than I am.”

Here’s an audio of that discussion below

 

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High-achievers are more likely to CHEAT in exams – and women are just as bad at swindling their results as men

Students known as ‘high achievers’ are more likely to cheat in their exams than dropouts, according to a new study.

Previously it was held that lower-level students had more to gain from cheating.

However, smart kids who took highly competitive courses were in fact more likely to try their luck, the study found.

Research also showed girls were just as likely to swindle their results as boys – with half of all cheating being done by ‘repeat offenders’.

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Previously it was commonly held that lower-level students had more to gain from cheating in the form of higher grades and were therefore more likely to cheat (stock image)

WHAT DID THEY DO?

The research team scanned more than 3,600 original exams from 11 undergraduate physiology-based courses to determine how frequently academic misconduct was committed.

They examined 448 resubmitted tests for additions or deletions of text or additional markings that were not present on the original exams.

The researchers found 78 cases of cheating, almost half of which were submitted by ‘repeat offenders’ – students who had cheated on more than one test during the study period.

It is traditionally difficult to get accurate statistics on cheating because most students won’t admit to it.

Self-reports suggest that less than 50 per cent of university students cheat at some point in their academic career.

For decades it has been assumed lower-level students were more likely to do it but researchers from the University of Guelph in Ontario found the opposite was true.

‘In a physiology-based department, we had a concern that students were altering written tests and resubmitting them for higher grades; thereby compromising the integrity of our primary assessment style’, researchers wrote in their paper.

Regrading – submitting an unaltered exam for another look by the professor – is a common practice offered to students who think their original grade was not accurate.

The research team scanned more than 3,600 original exams from 11 undergraduate physiology-based courses to determine how frequently academic misconduct was committed.

They examined 448 resubmitted tests for additions or deletions of text or additional markings that were not present on the original exams.

The team scanned more than 3,600 original exams from 11 undergraduate physiology-based courses to determine how frequently academic misconduct was committed (stock image) 

The team scanned more than 3,600 original exams from 11 undergraduate physiology-based courses to determine how frequently academic misconduct was committed (stock image)

The researchers found 78 cases of cheating, almost half of which were submitted by ‘repeat offenders’ – students who had cheated on more than one test during the study period.

The difference between male and female cheaters was insignificant.

Two-thirds of the cases of academic misconduct were identified in one highly competitive course.

‘Our results point to high-achieving students as a specific group who may be more likely to commit these acts and show no indication that men are more frequent offenders than women, which goes against much of the existing [academic misconduct] literature,’ the researchers wrote.

‘Vigilance should be employed by all faculty who accept tests for regrading’, researchers said.

Read more: dailymail

Nandi MCA Fredrick Kipkemboi scores 250 marks in KCPE

Kapsabet ward MCA Fredrick Kipkemboi made it to the top 10 among 226 private entrants in the 2014 KCPE exam.

The 30-year-old MCA scored 250 marks.

“I received the results via SMS and I’m very happy because I have qualified to pursue higher education,” Kipkemboi told the Star on the phone.

The MCA said he used to lock himself in his car to prepare for the exam.

He also received private coaching from teachers in his Singorwa village in Kapsabet town

Kipkemboi said he will sit the 2018 KCSE exam.

 

200,000 KCPE Candidates set to miss form one

Close to 200,000 students will miss the chance to join Form One in 2015, according to the ministry of Education.

Education Cabinet Secretary Jacob Kaimenyi, releasing the 2014 Kenya Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE) examinations results yesterday, said 686,779 candidates are eligible to transit to secondary schools.

The results were released without the traditional school ranking.

Amongst the best performers was Tracey Achieng Okwach, of New Light Academy, Kayole, Nairobi, with 441 marks.

Other leading pupils were Pauline Wakiuru of Nyeri Good Shepherd Academy, with 437 marks, and Linet Waithera from High Peak Junior Academy in Naivasha, Nakuru County, who scored 437 marks.

Her two classmates Felistus Waithera and Samson Gikonyo followed closely, with, respectively, 436 and 432 marks.

Impressive results were also registered by Leah Njeri Wanjohi, of Effort Schools in Kirinyaga County, with 433 marks.

Releasing the results, Prof Jacob Kaimenyi announced that 431,686 out of the total 880,486 candidates scored between 251 and 450 marks, while 445,981 scored between 0 and 250 marks.

The top candidate in the 2013 KCPE had 444 marks out of the possible 500. With 839,759 candidates in 2013, a total of 467,353 students scored less than 250 marks.

http://www.the-star.co.ke/news/200000-kcpe-candidates-set-miss-form-one

Close to 200,000 students will miss the chance to join Form One in 2015, according to the ministry of Education.

Education Cabinet Secretary Jacob Kaimenyi, releasing the 2014 Kenya Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE) examinations results yesterday, said 686,779 candidates are eligible to transit to secondary schools.

The results were released without the traditional school ranking.

Amongst the best performers was Tracey Achieng Okwach, of New Light Academy, Kayole, Nairobi, with 441 marks.

Other leading pupils were Pauline Wakiuru of Nyeri Good Shepherd Academy, with 437 marks, and Linet Waithera from High Peak Junior Academy in Naivasha, Nakuru County, who scored 437 marks.

Her two classmates Felistus Waithera and Samson Gikonyo followed closely, with, respectively, 436 and 432 marks.

Impressive results were also registered by Leah Njeri Wanjohi, of Effort Schools in Kirinyaga County, with 433 marks.

Releasing the results, Prof Jacob Kaimenyi announced that 431,686 out of the total 880,486 candidates scored between 251 and 450 marks, while 445,981 scored between 0 and 250 marks.

The top candidate in the 2013 KCPE had 444 marks out of the possible 500. With 839,759 candidates in 2013, a total of 467,353 students scored less than 250 marks.

 

No Ranking for KCPE Candidates as Kaimenyi releases results

Education Cabinet Secretary Jacob Kaimenyi has released the KCPE results. Top candidates and schools were not ranked in this system unlike in the previous years. The Education ministry abolished the ranking system to reduce competition and cheating in schools.

The CS said that because schools are eager to be ranked highly, they engage in “harmful” practices, such as removing weak students from schools, and some schools maintaining low numbers which in turn put a financial strain on parents.

He also said that making students repeat is another demerit of ranking that the education ministry is keen on doing away with. Kaimenyi added that not all schools have the same resource and therefore ranking is unfair to schools that are not as endowed.

Candidates can access their examination results from the KNEC website as from 1/01/2014 on www.knec.ac.ke or by texting their index numbers to 22252.

Rankings of students and schools in national examinations abolished

The Ministry of Education has abolished the ranking of students according to their performance in KCPE and KCSE examinations.

Schools will also not be ranked in the new rule that was contained in a circular signed by Principal Secretary Dr. Belio Kipsang and sent to all county directors of education, sub-county education officers and principals of public secondary schools.

“There will be regular review and recasting of school performance merit measuring and therefore ranking of schools and students on the basis of national examinations results is discontinued with immediate effect,” a statement from the Education Ministry states.

The rules are part of a series of measures that the Ministry has issued to guide the management of Secondary Schools.

The circular provides guidance on registrations of new schools, management of school finances, procurement of goods and services, and on recruitment of non-teaching staff.

 

Students sit for their exams in hospital

Two candidates sat the Kenya Certificate of Primary Education examination at the Kenyatta National Hospital.

Charles Gitau and Edwin Wandera wrote the exam from their hospital beds.

The exam begun on Tuesday and ended yesterday.

A third female candidate also admitted at the hospital did not sit all papers due to lack of preparations.

KNH management set aside two cubicles, where the pupils sat the exams.

Gitau and Wandera are aspiring to become pilots.

A supervisor, invigilator and policeman were deployed to the exam room.

“I am giving my best and am confident that I will pass the exam,” said Wandera, admitted at KNH on October 20 after falling from a moving vehicle.

The Dandora Primary School pupil said his condition motivated him to sit the exam with confidence.

Wandera, admitted in KNH’s Ward 5B is scheduled to undergo a second surgery.

“I have been preparing for these exams for a long time and the thought of not doing them. I am happy to have been given a second chance.”

Gitau, a pupil at Mangoto Primary School, Gatundu, is admitted in KNH’s Ward 4D.

He is a victim of kerosene lamp explosion.

“I was in the room alone studying, when I suddenly found myself surrounded by darkness, which was preceded by a loud bang,” Gitau said.

He suffered facial burns and 27 per cent burns on the abdomen and neck.

The nurses in charge of the two wards praised the boys whom they described as “warriors with strong hearts”.

“They are aggressive with books and are always confident. They used every single minute to revise for the exams,” said Owuor Ochieng the nurse in charge of Ward 5B.

“The hospital set aside two special rooms and ensured the TV remained off until the exam was over,” Kochumba said.

Yesterday the boys sat for the Social Studies and Religious Education paper to mark the end of the exams.

“With the support from the management, the hospital has set aside two special rooms and even ensured that the [ward] TV remains shut until the day’s exams are over,” said Phelesia Kochumba, the exam supervisor.

Yesterday the boys sat for the Social Studies and Religious Education paper, which marked the end of the three-day rigorous exercise.

Source :The Star

Kapsabet MCA aged 39 sits KCPE examination

Kapsabet MCA Fred Kemboi is among the 19,090 Kenya Certificate of Primary Education examination candidates in Nandi Central.

His presence attracted a lot of interest within the examination centre as he was surrounded by other candidates after the Mathematics paper.

Kipkemboi was elected on a URP ticket in the March 4, 2013 general election. “I went back to school after i was elected to the county assembly having realised that one cannot progress and properly understand the proceedings without enough education,” he said.

Kipkemboi said he has been studying at home and being tutored privately. “I was motivated by a public enthusiast who has been using my education background to overlook my ability,” he said.

KCPE kicks off

The Kenya Certificate of Primary Education has kicked off Tuesday morning countrywide. Over 889,107 are in the race for form one slots. KNEC CEO Joseph Kivilu says all is set for the exams that end on Thursday. Nairobi county has the highest number of candidates this year followed by Nakuru and Kiambu

Meanwhile, more police officers have been deployed in schools in Turkana and parts of Baringo to ensure smooth flow of the examination.

59 inmates sit KCPE in Naivasha

The number of candidates sitting KCPE examination at Naivasha Prison has increased to 59 from 49 last year.

Among the inmates is 51-year-old Musieba Shitulo, the oldest candidate in the prison.

The youngest candidate is Alphonce Kosgei aged 24.

Njuki Warui, 42, who started in pre-unit in the prison in 2001 will also sit the Kenya Certificate of Primary Education exam.

Hours to the exam, which starts tomorrow, the inmates are confident that they will perform well.

Officer in charge of the prison Patrick Mwenda yesterday said 10 of the candidates are on death row.

 

KCPE kicks off Tuesday

889,107 students are set to kick off their Kenya Certificate of Primary Education Tuesday after rehearsals are done Monday in 24,278 centres. . The number of candidates is slightly higher than last year’s 844,475

KNEC CEO Joseph Kivilu says all exam papers have been sent to their respective centres. Meanwhile, over 200 KCPE candidates in parts of Turkana and Baringo may miss the exams after five schools were closed due to insecurity.

Government to start paying KCPE and KCSE registration fees for candidates

Starting next year, parents and guardians will no longer be required to pay registration fees for KCPE and KCSE candidates.

Deputy President William Ruto says the government has allocated Sh4 billion for this purpose.

Ruto was addressing the annual Primary School Head Teachers Conference being held in Mombasa