Why e-cigarette flavors are so dangerous

Flavored e-cigarettes could cause disease by triggering inflammation, according to new research.

Additives that make them taste like fruit, sweets, soft drinks or even desserts change their chemistry – making them potentially more harmful.

It could make teenagers, in particular, more prone to irritation, allergies and asthma as their lungs are still developing, scientists warn.

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The finding adds to increasing evidence that flavors like bubblegum, orange, creme brulee and mango smoothie may trigger serious health problems – including tumors.

Senior author Professor Sven-Eric Jordt said the sweet, fruity flavorings react with vaping liquid, or e-juice.

These create different compounds that increase the risk of irritation and inflammation when inhaled.

Prof Jordt, a cancer biologist at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, explained: ‘These individual ingredients are combining to form more complex chemicals that are not disclosed to the user.

‘When inhaled, these compounds will persist in the body for some time, activating irritant pathways.

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‘Over time, this mild irritation could cause an inflammatory response.’

A study earlier this year found some flavors, particularly citrus and floral based ones, produce free radicals – toxins associated with cancer.

Last month the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) described teen vaping as ‘an epidemic’ and said flavored e-cigs could be banned, before launching a raid on the Juul headquarters – the biggest raid in the agency’s 100-year history.

Now Dr Jordt and colleagues have found when flavorings like vanilla, cherry, citrus and cinnamon mingled with the e-cig solvents polypropylene glycol and glycerol, they turned into acetals.

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Lab experiments showed these chemicals created from mixing flavors into e-liquids fired receptors that cause lung irritation.

These are the same molecules that maintain irritation and inflammation in people with asthma – or those who have inhaled smoke or fumes, reports Nicotine & Tobacco Research.

Now Dr Jordt and colleagues have found when flavorings like vanilla, cherry, citrus and cinnamon mingled with the e-cig solvents polypropylene glycol and glycerol, they turned into acetals.

Lab experiments showed these chemicals created from mixing flavors into e-liquids fired receptors that cause lung irritation.

These are the same molecules that maintain irritation and inflammation in people with asthma – or those who have inhaled smoke or fumes, reports Nicotine & Tobacco Research.

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Here Is The Bitter Truth About E-cigarettes

E-cigarettes are everywhere with many smokers relying on so-called vaping to satisfy their nicotine cravings.

Although e-cigarettes do not produce smoke, their nicotine content has left some users worried as to whether their vapour may damage DNA and lead to tumours.

Yet, a new study has revealed e-cigarettes do not cause cancer.

The finding re-enforces claims that e-cigs are a safer alternative to tobacco, the study claims.

According to Action on Smoking and Health, around 2.8 million adults in the UK use e-cigarettes.

Researchers from London-based British American Tobacco exposed laboratory cells to the emissions of an electronic or standard cigarette.

The study, published in the journal of Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, revealed that only traces of the normal cigarette collected in the cells and promoted tumour development.

The e-cigarette caused no cancer-related toxicity at any nicotine dose.

Following these findings, the researchers plan to use similar methods to their laboratory cell technique, known as a Bhas 42 assay, to continue to compare conventional and electronic cigarettes.

Study author Dr Damien Breheny said: ‘This is the first time this particular test, the Bhas 42 assay, has been used to compare tobacco and nicotine products.

‘It is one of a series of tests being developed and refined by British American Tobacco to compare the relative biological effects of e-cigarettes and tobacco-heating products with conventional cigarettes.’

This comes after an investigation by the Royal Society of Public Health found nine out of 10 e-cigarette retailers sell the products to customers who had never smoked.

This contravenes retail guidelines.

The investigation looked into 100 of the UK’s specialist vape shops and found 87 per cent of stores were knowingly or unwittingly prepared to sell e-cigarettes to non-historic smokers.

Results also revealed that 45 per cent of stores did not check whether new customers were current or former smokers.

Of those that did check, 76 per cent continued to encourage the customer to start vaping, even once they knew they were a non-smoker.

E-cigs make quitting harder, contested study claims

E-cigarettes, touted as an aide for giving up tobacco, in fact lowers the odds of quitting success, claimed research Thursday that was immediately criticised as flawed.

A research duo from the University of California, San Francisco reviewed the findings of 38 studies conducted across the globe into e-cigarette use, and concluded that smokers who use the devices were 28 percent less likely to quit smoking tobacco.

Published in the journal Lancet Respiratory Medicine, it claimed to be the largest review of e-cigarette’s value as a tool to help smokers kick the habit.

Looking at the data, it seemed that e-cigarettes in fact hampered attempts at quitting, the team said.

“The irony is that quitting smoking is one of the main reasons both adults and kids use e-cigarettes, but the overall effect is less, not more, quitting,” co-author Stanton Glantz said in a statement issued by the university.

“While there is no question that a puff on an e-cigarette is less dangerous than a puff on a conventional cigarette, the most dangerous thing about e-cigarettes is that they keep people smoking conventional cigarettes.”

E-cigarettes are battery-powered devices that heat up a liquid containing nicotine and artificial flavouring. The vapour is inhaled — “vaped” — and exhaled, much like a cigarette.

In the last few years, health experts and watchdogs have been embroiled in debate as to whether the gadgets, often not strictly regulated, are safe.

They can also be used with nicotine-free liquids, but some fear e-cigarettes could be a gateway to “real” cigarettes for teenagers.

Experts who were not involved in the new study were cautious, some scathing in their comments.

Peter Hajek, direct of the Queen Mary University of London’s Tobacco Dependence Research Unit, called it “grossly misleading”.

The work, he said, looked only at current smokers who had at some point used an e-cigarette — thus excluding any former smokers who may have used exactly such a device to quit.

Ann McNeill, a King’s College London professor of tobacco addiction, said the review was “not scientific”. It included data from two studies she had co-authored, but used in ways she claimed was “either inaccurate or misleading”.

“I believe the findings should therefore be dismissed.”

Steven Bernstein of the Yale School of Medicine, in a comment carried by The Lancet, said that despite concerns over the data, the study did raise questions about the usefulness of e-cigarettes as quitting aides.

Photo Credits : AFP

Second-hand smoke from e-cigarettes contains toxic metals, researchers say

Although e-cigarettes are somewhat safer compared to regular cigarettes, they can still release dangerous toxins into the air.

According to new research from USC, an overall 10-fold decrease in exposure to carcinogenic particles has been discovered. However, there are still certain levels of harmful metals in the air released from second-hand e-cigarette smoke that were found to be quite high.

Lead study author Arian Saffari, a PhD student at USC Viterbi, and colleagues sought to quantify the level of exposure to harmful organics and metals emitted from e-cigarette smoke, hoping to provide some insight for the regulatory authorities.

“The metal particles likely come from the cartridge of the e-cigarette devices themselves – which opens up the possibility that better manufacturing standards for the devices could reduce the quantity of metals in the smoke. Studies of this kind are necessary for implementing effective regulatory measures. E-cigarettes are so new, there just isn’t much research available on them yet,” said Saffari in a statement.

READ MORE: http://dailydigestnews.com/2014/09/second-hand-smoke-from-e-cigarettes-contains-toxic-metals-researchers-say/